ESPAÑOL  ENGLISH
UNIT1 UNIT2 UNIT3 UNIT4 UNIT5 UNIT6 UNIT7 UNIT8 UNIT9 UNIT10 UNIT11 UNIT12 UNIT13 UNIT14 UNIT15 UNIT16 UNIT17
 

UNIT 11:

NON-DISCRIMINATION AND NON-STIGMATIZATION

 

OUTLINE OF THE SYLLABUS

1. What is discrimination and stigmatization?

a. The notion ‘discrimination’
b. The notion ‘stigmatization’
c. The notion of Stigma in Mental Health

2. What is positive or reverse discrimination?

3. Grounds of discrimination

a. Advances in medical technology may create disproportionate disadvantages for some social groups
b. The unfair use of genetic testing
c. Genetic discrimination

4. Legal context

a. Explanation of Article 11
b. Background for the Article


 

5. Limitations of the principle:

a. Each principle of the Declaration relates to the other principles (Art. 26)
b. Limiting the application of the principles is regulated in Article 27
c. The protection of public health can be a limiting factor

6. Stigma in Mental Health

a. How to develop an Anti-Stigma Program
b. Stigma in different sectors of society
c. Mental Illness & myths about dangerousness

 
FILM: The Elephant Man / (D. Lynch, 1980)

Synopsis

Joseph Merrick, a 19th-century Englishman afflicted with a disfiguring congenital disease, attempts to regain the dignity he lost after years spent as a side-show freak.



Ethical Issues
Discrimination, stigmatization

 
FILM: A Beautiful Mind / (R. Howard, 2001)

Synopsis
Highly eccentric mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr. was a pioneer in the field of game theory, which made him a star of the 'new mathematics' in the 1950s. But his quick ascent into the intellectual stratosphere drastically changed course when Nash's intuitive brilliance was undermined by schizophrenia. Facing challenges that destroyed many others, Nash fought back with the help of his devoted wife Alicia. After decades of hardship, he triumphed over tragedy, and in 1994 he received the Nobel Prize.


Ethical Issues
Stigma, discrimination because of Mental Ilness

 
FILM: Miss Evers’ Boys / (J. Sargent, 1997)

Synopsis
In 1932 Macon County, Alabama, the federal government launched into a medical study called The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Blacks With Syphilis. The study selected 412 men infected with the disease and faked long term treatment, while really only giving them placebos and liniments. The premise of the action was to determine if blacks reacted similar to whites to the overall effects of the disease. The experiment was only discontinued 40 years later when a Senate investigation was initiated. At that time, only 127 of the original study group were left alive. The story is told from the point of view of Nurse Eunice Evers, who was well aware of the lack of treatment being offered, but felt her role was to console the involved men, many of whom were her direct friends. In fact the movie's name comes from the fact that a performing dancer and three musicians named their act for her - "Miss Evers' Boys". All had the disease. A romance with one goes unrequited even after he joins the army during World War II and is treated and cured by penicillin. As the result of the Senate investigation, the medical experimentation on humans has been curbed. The survivors of the study did receive treatment and financial compensation after the Senate Investigation.